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Review: OneShot: World Machine Edition - A Brilliant And Bittersweet Indie Darling

Niko, a cat-like child, wakes up in a decaying house with a bookshelf and a password-locked computer. There is also a remote control for the TV on..

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Niko, a cat-like child, wakes up in a decaying house with a bookshelf and a password-locked computer. There is also a remote control for the TV on the floor. It is too dark to see the books, and there is no sign of a password. You will have to figure out how to get out. Niko discovers a huge lightbulb hidden in the basement not long after. Niko takes the prize to the darkened wastes and a prophetic robot declares Niko the saviour. He is a hero meant to bring the sun to the tower in the centre of the globe to restore sunlight. This is OneShot: World Machine Edition. It's a point-and-click adventure game that was originally created in 2014. It tells a sad, endearing story.

OneShot is difficult to review as it would be too deep into the story. You should know this: Future Cat, the developer, makes you - the user - a character in its story. Niko's quest can be framed as a game that is installed on a PC and functions as both a narrative device and a menu. Desktop icons allow you to change wallpapers, alter the colour scheme, view achievements and other options. Niko will often break the fourth wall and address you by your Nintendo Switch profile number as she guides you through a dying world. Future Cat cleverly makes use of the dichotomy between the game on the computer and the game inside to add new layers to an already captivating adventure.

Item-based puzzles, like The Secret Of Monkey Island but with more despair than blatant humor - Niko should be stopped from moving through three different areas. A gatekeeping robot demanded that we sign a ledger, but had no pen. We went off, leading Niko through the crumbling Glen to trade an inkwell for something to dip in it. It was a conversation with forgotten robots and downtrodden people. They were all full of charm, with a touch of humor to keep things from getting too dark. We were able to solve all of the puzzles, unlike the point-and click adventures of twenty-three decades ago. However, the dopamine rush struck us when everything fell into place. We were sat in silence, contemplating the bittersweet ending, as the credits began to roll.

OneShot was designed originally for PCs. The process of installing the game on the console has caused problems with the control of the mouse pointer as well as the size of the in-game window windows. It was either difficult to see the details in the pixelated world when it was windowed, especially with the Switch undocked, or too blurry in full-screen mode due to thick and distracting borders.

These are not major problems. We can't see any reason to not recommend OneShot World Machine Edition to anyone who has even a passing interest point-and-click adventure games. It's hard to find a better way to spend an afternoon than leading Niko through one the most charming and creative Indie titles on Switch.

A sad, but moving story. Excellent910 Scoring Policy
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